Job Trends In Texas

News last week from the US Department of Labor shows that the unemployment rate dropped to its lowest in 3 years (8.3%) and the national jobs picture is seeing positive gains.  And while expert opinions vary wildly on the speed of any recovery (one predicts 2022), everyone seems to agree it is and will continue to get better.  This latest report got us thinking about what types of job trends we’ve seen here in Texas over the last few years and what, if anything, we might be able to tell from such information.

The top eight most frequently occurring job categories posted in WorkInTexas.com are, in no particular order: Office & Administrative Support; Production/Manufacturing; Transportation & Logistics/Warehousing; Sales (Retail & Wholesale); Installation, Maintenance & Repair; Construction; Healthcare; and Management.  The order in which they rank has fluctuated a bit over that three years, but those making up the top eight has not. 

So what does that tell us?  A couple of things.  First, it’s a reflection of the relationships we have with employers that customers keep coming back.  Over a third of all employers who post at least one job in WorkInTexas.com in a given year come back to post another during either or both of the two following years.  And given that a vast majority of employers in Texas are small (about 80% have less than 25 employees) and do not have year-round hiring needs, we see that as a pretty good trend.  And second, even during a great recession where many people in jobs generally considered “safe” did get laid off, we can see what the core economic driver-types of jobs are, and this shows they were still in some demand during the entire recession.

Additionally, you might check out this article about state competitiveness; that is which states have seen the most job growth and which have seen the least, over the last few years.  According to the data, Texas trails only North Dakota in total job growth, and in terms of number of jobs expected versus number of jobs existing, Texas has no equal.

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