Using “Keywords”

“Keywords” are one area of WorkInTexas.com for which we get a lot of questions, from all types of users. And while some seek to understand how and why they’re used, more often questions are about what types of things that make sense to be listed as keywords. And this is especially important if you want to ensure you get the best possible job matches.

The Thing

“Keywords” in WorkInTexas.com allow you to provide additional detail about individual and specific criteria and skills that you as an employer want or you as a job seeker have. These keywords are not automatically pulled from the job description. Instead, these are intentionally entered by employers and job seekers to help narrow job matches to more accurately meet the other’s expectations.

Computer programmer, mechanic, project manager, nurse, and others all have small but significant differences in skills sets and requirements that quickly make them good or bad matches. The specific skills for these types of jobs (.net, java; diesel engines, ASE certified; PMP, agile; RN, LVN) can make all the difference if added to your WorkInTexas.com posting or profile.

The Catch

Keywords don’t always fit. Customer Service and Good Communication are certainly skills, but are subject to interpretation as opposed to hard skills and recognized licenses, certifications, and the like.

Also, listing specific types of desired knowledge creates a hard match, particularly for job seekers. As an employer, you might value someone who has knowledge of the “Workforce Investment Act” and perceive it as a skill. However, would a job seeker know what that is, and would they think of it as a skill, or would they be more likely to think of it as a program for which their skill of Policy Analysis applies?

In a nutshell, the best results are achieved when listing specific terms that represent tangible things.

The Tips

  • Format matters – “C+” is not the same as “C +.” And “payroll” is not the same as “pay roll.” Enter keywords in the industry-standard format, to the extent there is one. If there’s not and it’s important to you, enter it twice (both ways).
  • Employers can include up to 10 keywords on a job posting AND have the option to require job seekers match one or all of them.
  • Keywords can be a max of 20 characters long so think concise. “Early Childhood Prog” probably won’t get you what you want.
  • Use the “View Examples and Top 10 Keywords” link. This will help you understand what others have entered and what you might expect based on what you’re entering.

Feel free to comment on this post if you have questions.

As always, good luck.

6 thoughts on “Using “Keywords”

  1. cantu May 25, 2015 / 11:13 am

    Get rid of keywords

    Like

  2. Anonymous May 26, 2015 / 2:54 pm

    This feature in WIT has an ambiguous value.

    Like

  3. Scott Eychner May 27, 2015 / 6:41 pm

    Thanks for the comment. We might, at least in their current form. We’ll soon be undertaking a project to essentially remake WorkInTexas.com. Making the application more logical and user-intuitive is one of the core principles guiding that project.

    Like

  4. Scott Eychner May 27, 2015 / 6:43 pm

    Thanks for the comment. Agreed. As noted in the post, sometimes it can be very helpful while other times not at all. We’ll soon be undertaking a project to essentially remake WorkInTexas.com. Making the application more logical and user-intuitive is one of the core principles guiding that project. And to that end, this feature is one we’ll take a hard look at to revise.

    Like

  5. Anonymous June 12, 2015 / 5:46 pm

    The keywords have no value when matching job seekers to job postings. If the employer has odd keywords and wants an exact match. You will not get the match, or it will take a while to match the job seeker. Very frustrating to the job seeker. Loss the keywords. Thank you

    Like

  6. Scott Eychner June 15, 2015 / 2:37 pm

    Thanks for the input. We’re planning some significant changes to WorkInTexas.com and this keyword feature is one we’ll take a hard re-look at.

    Like

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